Virtual Conference on Vaccines & Immunology

Theme: Vaccine: Development and Therapy

03rd Dec-04th Dec 2020    Online , Event

A COVID‑19 vaccine is a biotechnology product intended to provide acquired immunity against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‑19). As of September 2020, there were 321 vaccine candidates in development, a 2.5 fold increase since April. However, no candidates have completed clinical trials to prove its safety and efficacy. In September, some 39 vaccine candidates were in clinical research, 33 in Phase I–II trials, and 6 in Phase II–III trials.

Increasing and evolving demands for all types of products creates new challenges for vaccine manufacturers. As the market grows, innovative approaches to development and production will be needed to accelerate the delivery of novel products. Health policy-makers are encouraging the use of new technology to meet these challenges and make vaccines more accessible.

Vaccine Development is an activity that focuses on a variety of technological initiatives and applied research, which enhance and promote improved systems and practices for vaccine safety. In the past year, the unprecedented Ebola disease outbreak galvanized research and industry response and as we continue to search for solutions, we must review the lessons learned in order to overcome the current challenges. Vaccines development is a long, complex process, often lasting 10-15 years and involving a combination of public and private involvement. The current system for developing, testing, and regulating vaccines developed during the 20th century as the groups involved standardized their procedures and regulations.

Population protection by vaccination against infections has been one of the major achievements of public health and is of considerable importance in controlling respiratory diseases. Vaccine against the Influenza Virus,Vaccine against Pertussis,Vaccine against Tuberculosis, Vaccine against Streptococcus Pneumonia

The vaccine industry, particularly, in major Western markets, continues to be dominated by a few major, long-established players that primarily manufacture aging, long-marketed, non-recombinant (nongenetically engineered) vaccines. The industry, however, will be changing in the coming years and this change may come rather rapidly.

Assess how to improve your clinical trial performance, from developing novel immunological assays to creating clinical efficacy.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest threats to both human and animal health today. AMR can affect anyone, of any age, and in any country. It can lead to longer hospital stays, higher medical costs, and possibly death. AMR occurs when germs that can cause infections, such as bad bacteria, become resistant to medicines, such as antibiotics, used to kill them. There is a growing appreciation for the role of vaccines in confronting the problem of antimicrobial resistance. Vaccines can reduce the prevalence of resistance by reducing the need for antimicrobial use and can reduce its impact by reducing the total number of cases.

Emerging diseases are those whose incidence in humans has increased in the past two decades, and re-emergence is the reappearance of a known disease after a significant decline in incidence.4 The magnitude of the problem is illustrated by the appearance of several new pathogens causing disease of marked severity, such as the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) and other retroviruses, arenaviruses, Hantaviruses and the Ebola virus. Old pathogens such as cholera, plague, dengue hemorrhagic fever and yellow fever have re-emerged and are having considerable impact in the Americas. Re-emerging, or resurging, diseases are those that have been around for decades or centuries, but have come back in a different form or a different location. Examples are West Nile virus in the Western hemisphere, monkeypox in the United States, and dengue rebounding in Brazil and other parts of South America and working its way into the Caribbean.

Immunotherapeutics is a treatment that uses your body's immune system to help fight cancer. Get information about the different types of immunotherapy and the types of cancer they are used to treat. The main types of immunotherapy now being used to treat cancer include:Cancer vaccines, Monoclonal antibodies, Immune checkpoint inhibitors, Other, non-specific immunotherapies. Some types of immunotherapy are also sometimes called biologic therapy or biotherapy. In the last few decades immunotherapy has become an important part of treating some types of cancer. Newer types of immune treatments are now being studied, and they'll impact how we treat cancer in the future. Immunotherapy includes treatments that work in different ways. Some boost the body immune system in a very general way. Others help train the immune system to attack cancer cells specifically. Immunotherapy works better for some types of cancer than for others. It's used by itself for some of these cancers, but for others it seems to work better when used with other types of treatment.

Vaccines are the best defense we have against serious, preventable and sometimes deadly contagious diseases. Vaccines are some of the safest medical products available, but like any other medical product, there may be health risks. Accurate information about the value of vaccines as well as their possible side-effects helps people to make informed decisions about vaccination. The safety of vaccines is carefully monitored, starting early in the product development and continuing for as long as the vaccine is being used. Find out about what is done before and after vaccines are approved for use and what is known about the benefits and safety of specific vaccines. There is a lot of false information about vaccines safety on the Internet. This can be confusing. Discover the answers to common questions and concerns about vaccines.

About the Event

Welcome to the Virtual Conference on Vaccines & Immunology organized by Med2Pharm!!

World-renowned speakers, academicians, researchers, doctors, business experts and delegates across the globe will participate in the conference and discuss the cause, effect, prevention as well as the future roadmap of a Vaccine & Vaccination in a global context. The conference will provide unlimited resources to interact with prominent key persons in the field and greatly expand on your global network of scholars and professionals.

Vaccine Virtual Conference 2020 will facilitate discussions on a wide range of topics related to vaccination at all levels through collaboration and open dialogue and steering tomorrow’s agenda to improve research, education, healthcare, and policy outcomes.

Why to attend Vaccine Virtual Conference 2020?

Meet your target market with individuals from round the world focused on learning Vaccination: Developement and Therapy; this is regularly your single most obvious opportunity to accomplish the most important assemblage of participants from the Universities, Research institutions, and Hospitals. Conduct demonstrations, data, meet with present and potential speakers, make a sprinkle with a replacement wares, and get name acknowledgment at this 2-day event. Incredibly renowned speakers, the chief ongoing procedures, strategies, and furthermore the most current updates Radiology and advancing field’s square measure signs of the gathering.

Conference Benefits:

  1. Continuing Education Hours
  2. Networking Opportunities
  3. Learning New Technologies
  4. Ignite new ideas in current trends
  5. Keynote Speaker & Speaker Opportunity
  6. International Certificated accredited by the scientific committee
  7. Workshop on current research & trending technologies
  8. Training sessions by experts
  9. Conference Kit
  10. Business opportunities
  11. Advertising & Marketing Opportunities
  12. Job Opportunities for students
  13. Sponsorship opportunities
  14. Exhibitor Opportunities

Conference Sessions

Track 1: Emerging and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases

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Emerging diseases are those whose incidence in humans has increased in the past two decades, and re-emergence is the reappearance of a known disease after a significant decline in incidence.4 The magnitude of the problem is illustrated by the appearance of several new pathogens causing disease of marked severity, such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other retroviruses, arenaviruses, Hantaviruses and the Ebola virus. Old pathogens such as cholera, plague, dengue hemorrhagic fever and yellow fever have re-emerged and are having considerable impact in the Americas.

Re-emerging, or resurging, diseases are those that have been around for decades or centuries, but have come back in a different form or a different location. Examples are West Nile virus in the Western hemisphere, monkeypox in the United States, and dengue rebounding in Brazil and other parts of South America and working its way into the Caribbean.

  1. HIV/AIDS
  2. Malaria and Tuberculosis
  3. Influenza
  4. SARS
  5. Ebola
  6. Nipah
  7. West Nile Virus
  8. Monkey pox
     

Track 2: Vaccine Research & Development

Conference Image

Vaccine Development is an activity that focuses on a variety of technological initiatives and applied research, which enhance and promote improved systems and practices for vaccine safety. In the past year, the unprecedented Ebola disease outbreak galvanized research and industry response and as we continue to search for solutions, we must review the lessons learned in order to overcome the current challenges. Vaccines development is a long, complex process, often lasting 10-15 years and involving a combination of public and private involvement. The current system for developing, testing, and regulating vaccines developed during the 20th century as the groups involved standardized their procedures and regulations.

  1. Basic Vaccinology
  2. Vaccines discovery, development & formulation
  3. Vaccine Management & Quality Assurance
  4. Vaccine Immunoinformatics

Track 3: Influenza and Respiratory Diseases

Conference Image

Population protection by vaccination against infections has been one of the major achievements of public health and is of considerable importance in controlling respiratory diseases.

  1. Vaccine against the Influenza Virus
  2. Vaccine against Pertussis
  3. Vaccine against Tuberculosis
  4. Vaccine against Streptococcus Pneumonia

Track 4: Vaccines Bioprocessing and Manufacturing

Conference Image

The vaccine industry, particularly, in major Western markets, continues to be dominated by a few major, long-established players that primarily manufacture aging, long-marketed, non-recombinant (nongenetically engineered) vaccines. The industry, however, will be changing in the coming years and this change may come rather rapidly.


Track 5: Vaccines Pre-Clinical Validation to Clinical Trials

Conference Image

Assess how to improve your clinical trial performance, from developing novel immunological assays to creating clinical efficacy.

Track 6: Anti-Microbial Resistance

Conference Image

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest threats to both human and animal health today. AMR can affect anyone, of any age, and in any country. It can lead to longer hospital stays, higher medical costs, and possibly death.

AMR occurs when germs that can cause infections, such as bad bacteria, become resistant to medicines, such as antibiotics, used to kill them.

There is a growing appreciation for the role of vaccines in confronting the problem of antimicrobial resistance. Vaccines can reduce the prevalence of resistance by reducing the need for antimicrobial use and can reduce its impact by reducing the total number of cases.

Role of Vaccines in Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

  1. Vaccines as part of antibiotic stewardship
  2. Prevent bacterial infections and avoid need for antibiotics
  3. Prevent use of antibiotics for viral infections
  4. Reduce transmission of antibiotic resistant strains
  5. Develop new vaccines to target resistant pathogens
  6. Assess regulatory pathways and clinical trial designs to facilitate vaccine development
  7. Understand vaccine markets and incentives to support R&D for new vaccines
     

Track 7: Vaccines Technology

Conference Image

Increasing and evolving demands for all types of products creates new challenges for vaccine manufacturers. As the market grows, innovative approaches to development and production will be needed to accelerate the delivery of novel products.

Health policy-makers are encouraging the use of new technology to meet these challenges and make vaccines more accessible.

  1. DNA delivery technologies
  2. Needle-free vaccine delivery
  3. Nanopatch Technologies
  4. Delivery systems for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines
     

Track 8: Cancer and Immunotherapy

Conference Image

Immunotherapeutics is a treatment that uses your body's immune system to help fight cancer. Get information about the different types of immunotherapy and the types of cancer they are used to treat. The main types of immunotherapy now being used to treat cancer include:

  1. Cancer vaccines
  2. Monoclonal antibodies
  3. Immune checkpoint inhibitors
  4. Other, non-specific immunotherapies
     

Some types of immunotherapy are also sometimes called biologic therapy or biotherapy.

In the last few decades immunotherapy has become an important part of treating some types of cancer. Newer types of immune treatments are now being studied, and they’ll impact how we treat cancer in the future.

Immunotherapy includes treatments that work in different ways. Some boost the body’s immune system in a very general way. Others help train the immune system to attack cancer cells specifically. Immunotherapy works better for some types of cancer than for others. It’s used by itself for some of these cancers, but for others it seems to work better when used with other types of treatment.

  1. Feline Leukemia Vaccines
  2. Cancer Immunotherapy Biomarkers
  3. Non-specific cancer immunotherapies and adjuvants
  4. Oncolytic viral therapies
  5. Gene-therapy
  6. CAR T-Cell Therapy
     

Track 9: Vaccines Safety and Efficacy

Conference Image

Vaccines are the best defense we have against serious, preventable and sometimes deadly contagious diseases. Vaccines are some of the safest medical products available, but like any other medical product, there may be health risks. Accurate information about the value of vaccines as well as their possible side-effects helps people to make informed decisions about vaccination. The safety of vaccines is carefully monitored, starting early in the product development and continuing for as long as the vaccine is being used. Find out about what is done before and after vaccines are approved for use and what is known about the benefits and safety of specific vaccines. There is a lot of false information about vaccines safety on the Internet. This can be confusing. Discover the answers to common questions and concerns about vaccines.

  1. Vaccine Administration, Storage & Handling
  2. Factors Influencing Vaccine efficacy
  3. Vaccine safety communication
  4. Vaccine Safety Monitoring and Vaccine Pharmacovigilance
  5. Patient and Public acceptance and perceptions
  6. Post marketing surveillance of Vaccines
     

Track 10: Veterinary Vaccines

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Veterinary vaccines are to improve the health and welfare of companion animals, cost-effectively increase the production of livestock, and prevent animal-to-human transmission from both domestic animals and wildlife. Several vaccine types can de be distinguished among the second-generation veterinary vaccines, depending on whether they are live or inactivated, according to the strain of rabies virus used and the characteristics of the cell-substrate chosen for viral replication. More recently a third generation of live veterinary rabies vaccine has been developed using recombinant technology. Depending upon the expression system these vaccines are used either parenterally or orally. Oral rabies vaccines are widely used in foxes in Europe and raccoons in the USA.

  1. Current status of Veterinary Vaccines
  2. Safety or efficacy of a Veterinary medicine
  3. Vaccines for Livestock Diseases
  4. Animal health outcomes
  5. Recent Advances in Animal Vaccination

Track 11: Hepatitis Vaccines

Viral hepatitis is a genuine medical issue everywhere throughout the world. Notwithstanding, the decrease of the bleakness and mortality because of immunizations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a noteworthy segment in the general lessening in antibody preventable infections. We will examine the study of disease transmission, immunization advancement, and post-inoculation impacts of the hepatitis A and B infection. Furthermore, we examine endeavors to give the hepatitis D antibody to the 350 million people tainted with hepatitis B all around. Given the absence of a hepatitis C antibody, the numerous difficulties confronting the generation of a hepatitis C immunization will be appeared, alongside present and previous inoculation trials. As there is no present FDA-endorsed hepatitis E immunization, we will introduce inoculation information that is accessible in whatever is left of the world. At last, we will talk about the current difficulties and inquiries confronting future undertakings for every one of the hepatitis infections, with endeavors proceeding to center on significantly diminishing the dismalness and mortality related to these genuine contaminations of the liver.

  1. Hepatitis A
  2. Hepatitis B
  3. Hepatitis C
  4. Hepatitis D

Track 12: HIV/AIDS Vaccines

The long-term aim is to develop a non-toxic and effective vaccine that defends people worldwide after getting infected with HIV. However, even if a vaccine only defends some people who get vaccinated, or even if it affords less than total protection by reducing the threat of infection, it could still have a major impact on the rates of transmission and help control the pandemic, particularly for populations at high risk of HIV infection. A partially effective vaccine could decrease the number of people who get infected with HIV, further reducing the number of people who can pass the virus on to others. By considerably reducing the number of new-fangled infections, we can stop the widespread.

  1. HIV Vaccine Strategies
  2. T cell-based Vaccines
  3. B cell-based Vaccines
  4. Innate & Mucosal Immunity
  5. Viral Vaccine Vectors

Track 13: Preventable Disease Vaccines

An antibody preventable sickness is an irresistible malady for which a compelling preventive immunization exists. On the off chance that a man procures an immunization-preventable ailment and passes on from it, the demise is viewed as an antibody preventable passing.

  1. Diphtheria
  2. Haemophilus influenzae serotype b disease
  3. Meningitis
  4. Tuberculosis
  5. Yellow fever
  6. Mumps
  7. Measles

Market Analysis

An estimated 12.6 million deaths each year are attributable to unhealthy environments - nearly one in four of total global deaths. Environmental risk factors, such as air, water and soil pollution, chemical exposures, climate change and ultraviolet radiation, contribute to more than 100 diseases and injuries.

In Asia:

The Asian healthcare market is expected to grow from $1835 billion in 2016 to over $2660 billion by 2020. This is mainly due to improved access to healthcare facilities amid increased government and private investments in addition to government initiatives that promote medical insurance and foreign investment. Cumulatively, this has seen a rise in the demand for healthcare services and pharmaceutical products. India is experiencing 22-25 per cent growth in medical tourism and the industry is expected to reach US$ 9 billion by 2020. There is a significant scope for enhancing healthcare services considering that healthcare spending as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is rising. The government’s expenditure on the health sector has grown to 1.4 per cent in FY18E from 1.2 per cent in FY14. The Government of India is planning to increase public health spending to 2.5 per cent of the country's GDP by 2025.

In Europe:

The European healthcare market is expected to grow from around $2080 billion in 2016 to around $2125 billion in 2020. This region has not witnessed a significant increase in the market size due to decrease in government expenditures due to weak economic conditions in many countries. Aging population poses a threat to the economy as it impacts the economy and increases government spending on healthcare and pensions. The estimates show that the population aged 65 and above in the European region is set to rise to 224 million in 2050. Italy has the highest percentage of elderly (above 65 years) population in Europe at 22%.

Europe's total GDP was $19.9 trillion in 2016 accounting for 26.7% of global GDP. Europe is one of the major global economic blocks. Many of the leading European countries form part of the European Union, a free trade and movement block with a single currency.

In USA:

U.S. health care spending increased 3.9 percent to reach $3.5 trillion, or $10,739 per person in 2017. Health care spending growth in 2017 was similar to average growth from 2008 to 2013, which preceded the faster growth experienced during the 2014-15 period that was marked by insurance coverage expansion and high rates of growth in retail prescription drug spending. The overall share of gross domestic product (GDP) related to health care spending was 17.9 percent in 2017, similar to that in 2016 (18.0 percent). The emergence of personalized medicine, increased use of exponential technologies, and entry of disruptive and non-traditional competitors, the demand for expanded care delivery sites, and revamped payment and public funding models are all impacting the financial performance of the health care ecosystem. Between 2017-2022, global health care spending is expected to rise 5.4 percent annually to just over $10 trillion.

In Africa: South Africa currently runs a two-tiered healthcare system, comprising of the public and the smaller, rapidly -growing private sector. The country spent 9% of its GDP on healthcare in 2017, which is 4% higher than the WHO’s recommended spending for a country of its socioeconomic status. Despite this high expenditure, health outcomes are still trailing in comparison with similar middle-income countries, mostly due to the inequities between the public and private sectors. To eliminate this inequality, the government is in the process of implementing National Health Insurance (NHI) to establish universal healthcare. This coverage will provide the population with required healthcare and financial protection to all citizens. Out of 1 billion inhabitants, 90% will be under 60 age group which tends to transform the healthcare industry in Africa.

In 2016, Flint Atlantic (Nigerian based healthcare impact investment firm) announced an investment jointly with US-based Polaris Partners (Polaris), a leading global healthcare venture capital firm to fund AHN’s expansion in Rwanda and across Africa over the next two years. Private providers sense opportunity in Africa healthcare, for instance, in Nigeria, where it has sold portable ultrasound scanners, GE has trained carers in remote villages how to identify the biggest pregnancy-complication risks.

In Australia: The Health Services subdivision includes a range of health services and facilities. General hospitals are the subdivision's largest revenue driver, accounting over half of Australia's health services revenue. General practitioners, clinical specialists and dentists also represent significant revenue streams for the subdivision. Australia's growing and ageing population, combined with expanding private health insurance coverage, is expected to generate strong demand for health services over the five years through 2018-19. Rising demand has primarily driven revenue growth, as inflation has outpaced increases in Medicare benefits per service and schedule fees in some industries.

Emerging Trends in Public Health:

A key problem affecting global health is the lack of focus of research and development (RnD) on medicines and technologies that are appropriate for low and middle income countries. There are several reasons for this including:

  1. RnD costs are high and so are focused on issues where there are large affluent markets.
  2. Low and middle income countries do not have their own health related RnD capacity

This situation is compounded by international patents and trade agreements that increase the cost of medicines and technologies for low and middle income countries.

The World Health Organisation has been active in working to alleviate this situation recently leading to an International resolution on research, development and innovation (RDI) in May 2013.  This will lead to the “implementation of a few health research and development demonstration projects to address identified gaps that disproportionately affect developing countries” but there remains lots of progress to be made in this area if an equitable global health agenda is to be realised.

Intellectual Property Rights (IPR):

International agreements relating t0 IPR (e.g. the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights – TRIPS Agreement) are particularly controversial when it comes to global health and also global economic development. Countries with strong pharmaceutical and medical industries support restrictive IPR as this supports the profitability of these industries and also helps to ensure that these industries engage in continued research and development activities. For low and middle income industries the priority is to obtain access to medicines at a price that is affordable for their population and also to foster their own research and development capacity.

Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) and Health:

There are a wide variety of technology types that have an important role to play in global health including drugs, diagnostics, medical imaging etc. ICTs are a technology type of particular interest to us through our involvement with Physiopedia. Three types of health ICT are identified as important:

Telemedicine – use of communication technologies for the support of healthcare delivery over a distance (e.g. patient consultation by telephone or web conferencing, support of a local healthcare professional by experts at a distance and health education at a distance).

eHealth –  connecting stakeholders to allow the sharing and use of health related data for individual treatment or setting overall policies (e.g. electronic medical records). NB eHealth is also used as an encompassing term for all electronic support of health that includies telemedicine and mHealth.

mHealth – health practices supported by the use of mobile devices (e.g. the use of SMS messages to send reminders that facilitate treatment compliance).

Our Organizing Committee

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Roy RilleraMarzo

Deputy Dean Asia Metropolitan University, Malaysia

Professor Dr. Roy RilleraMarzo is a Public Health Physician and Research Scholar. He is currently th
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Leena Sankla FFPH, FRSPH

Co-Founder & Director Solutions4Health, United Kingdom

Dr Leena is Co-founder and Director of Public Health at Solutions 4 Health, a pioneering artificial
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Ilknur Tanboga

Professor at Marmara University, Turkey

Professor Ilknur Tanboga was born in Eskiaehir/Turkey in 1950. She received PhD from Hacettepe Unive
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Ahmed G Hegazi

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, National Research Center

Dr. Ahmed G. Hegazi is working as a professor of Microbiology & Immunology at National Research Cent
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Dr Sam Vaknin

Visiting Professor of Psychology, Southern Federal University

Sam Vaknin is Visiting Professor of Psychology, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don, Russia a
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