Program

A COVID‑19 vaccine is a biotechnology product intended to provide acquired immunity against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‑19). As of September 2020, there were 321 vaccine candidates in development, a 2.5 fold increase since April. However, no candidates have completed clinical trials to prove its safety and efficacy. In September, some 39 vaccine candidates were in clinical research, 33 in Phase I–II trials, and 6 in Phase II–III trials.

Increasing and evolving demands for all types of products creates new challenges for vaccine manufacturers. As the market grows, innovative approaches to development and production will be needed to accelerate the delivery of novel products. Health policy-makers are encouraging the use of new technology to meet these challenges and make vaccines more accessible.

Vaccine Development is an activity that focuses on a variety of technological initiatives and applied research, which enhance and promote improved systems and practices for vaccine safety. In the past year, the unprecedented Ebola disease outbreak galvanized research and industry response and as we continue to search for solutions, we must review the lessons learned in order to overcome the current challenges. Vaccines development is a long, complex process, often lasting 10-15 years and involving a combination of public and private involvement. The current system for developing, testing, and regulating vaccines developed during the 20th century as the groups involved standardized their procedures and regulations.

Population protection by vaccination against infections has been one of the major achievements of public health and is of considerable importance in controlling respiratory diseases. Vaccine against the Influenza Virus,Vaccine against Pertussis,Vaccine against Tuberculosis, Vaccine against Streptococcus Pneumonia

The vaccine industry, particularly, in major Western markets, continues to be dominated by a few major, long-established players that primarily manufacture aging, long-marketed, non-recombinant (nongenetically engineered) vaccines. The industry, however, will be changing in the coming years and this change may come rather rapidly.

Assess how to improve your clinical trial performance, from developing novel immunological assays to creating clinical efficacy.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest threats to both human and animal health today. AMR can affect anyone, of any age, and in any country. It can lead to longer hospital stays, higher medical costs, and possibly death. AMR occurs when germs that can cause infections, such as bad bacteria, become resistant to medicines, such as antibiotics, used to kill them. There is a growing appreciation for the role of vaccines in confronting the problem of antimicrobial resistance. Vaccines can reduce the prevalence of resistance by reducing the need for antimicrobial use and can reduce its impact by reducing the total number of cases.

Emerging diseases are those whose incidence in humans has increased in the past two decades, and re-emergence is the reappearance of a known disease after a significant decline in incidence.4 The magnitude of the problem is illustrated by the appearance of several new pathogens causing disease of marked severity, such as the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) and other retroviruses, arenaviruses, Hantaviruses and the Ebola virus. Old pathogens such as cholera, plague, dengue hemorrhagic fever and yellow fever have re-emerged and are having considerable impact in the Americas. Re-emerging, or resurging, diseases are those that have been around for decades or centuries, but have come back in a different form or a different location. Examples are West Nile virus in the Western hemisphere, monkeypox in the United States, and dengue rebounding in Brazil and other parts of South America and working its way into the Caribbean.

Immunotherapeutics is a treatment that uses your body's immune system to help fight cancer. Get information about the different types of immunotherapy and the types of cancer they are used to treat. The main types of immunotherapy now being used to treat cancer include:Cancer vaccines, Monoclonal antibodies, Immune checkpoint inhibitors, Other, non-specific immunotherapies. Some types of immunotherapy are also sometimes called biologic therapy or biotherapy. In the last few decades immunotherapy has become an important part of treating some types of cancer. Newer types of immune treatments are now being studied, and they'll impact how we treat cancer in the future. Immunotherapy includes treatments that work in different ways. Some boost the body immune system in a very general way. Others help train the immune system to attack cancer cells specifically. Immunotherapy works better for some types of cancer than for others. It's used by itself for some of these cancers, but for others it seems to work better when used with other types of treatment.

Vaccines are the best defense we have against serious, preventable and sometimes deadly contagious diseases. Vaccines are some of the safest medical products available, but like any other medical product, there may be health risks. Accurate information about the value of vaccines as well as their possible side-effects helps people to make informed decisions about vaccination. The safety of vaccines is carefully monitored, starting early in the product development and continuing for as long as the vaccine is being used. Find out about what is done before and after vaccines are approved for use and what is known about the benefits and safety of specific vaccines. There is a lot of false information about vaccines safety on the Internet. This can be confusing. Discover the answers to common questions and concerns about vaccines.